Program Overview
Preparation for self-management of individual healthcare services is very important to young adults (17-20) in foster care.  The COACHES Program arms young adults with tools to help them manage their own health care.

 

Our one-on-one Coaches support participants in reaching their goals in the areas of:

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Coaches Empower Young Adults
The program establishes a collaborative relationship between young adults, their Coach and health and social service providers, to support young adults in planning for their futures. This collaboration seeks to:

  • Increase young adult’s knowledge and access to the full continuum of services and benefits, in the public and private sectors, that are available to young adults in foster care
  • Provide a “one stop” resource to transitioning young adults to focus on building their preparation for self-management and life skills
  • Coach them step-by-step on how to access and use healthcare, education, employment, finance, housing, life-skills and other support resources

The COACHES program supports young adults in gaining the knowledge and skills necessary to access healthcare services and enhances their life skills, to prepare them to live self-sufficiently.  

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Why COACHES?
The Coaching and Comprehensive Health Supports (COACHES) Program is delivered through a partnership between Families First and the Amerigroup Corporation.  The goal of the COACHES Program is to provide participating young adults with the knowledge and skills necessary to navigate and access their healthcare services, improve life skills and self-efficacy, increase connectedness with at least one identified adult support, and eventually live self-sufficiently. The COACHES Program employs personnel (Coaches) that maintain on-going coaching relationships with young adults ages 17-20, in Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) custody, residing in group homes, private foster homes, or Independent/ Transitional Living Program  housing in the designated counties over a two-year period to improve healthy behaviors and build their skills toward a successful transition to independence.

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Coaching is defined as a collaborative process of assessment, planning, facilitation, care coordination, evaluation, and advocacy to increase access to resources and services that combine to meet a young adult’s comprehensive health and support service needs.  This is accomplished through purposeful communication and linking to available resources to promote quality, cost-effective outcomes. The Coaches collaborate with participating young adults to plan, implement, monitor, and amend individualized coaching service plans that promote clients’ strengths, advance clients’ well-being, and help clients achieve their personal goals.

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Coaches serve as a resource for wraparound support not only through on-going communication with participating young adults, but through maintaining contact with the Care Management Organization (CMO), DFCS and the Room and Board Watchful Oversight (RBWO) also engaged with the young adult. Along with the CMO and RBWO, the Coach is as a part of the Care Planning Team supporting the young adult in planning for independence.  The Coach works to build clients’ skills in navigating/accessing services while also working with providers to ensure that resources are pooled and coordinated to improve access and outcomes for the young adults being served.  Through helping clients navigate their multiple sources of support, the Coach seeks to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of linkage to services and ensure service delivery meets the needs of the youth adults. 

 

DISCLOSURE
The project described is supported by Grant Number 1C1CMS331323 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of this publication are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies.